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Brottweiler (Brussels Griffon & Rottweiler Mix)

Nicole Cosgrove

Height: 17-26 inches
Weight: 45-80 pounds
Lifespan: 10-14 years
Colors: Light brown, dark brown, black, red, golden, tan
Suitable for: Singles or families who are looking for an affectionate companion
Temperament: Intelligent, sweet, loyal, jealous

A new hybrid dog breed has become popular among dog lovers. What is this exciting new breed? The loyal characteristics of a Rottweiler were crossed with the sensitive Brussels Griffon to make a charming dog called the Brottweiler. As a new breed, people are going crazy to find out what it’s like to own one of these modern pups, but does that mean they’re good companions?

Brottweilers are sweet and highly affectionate dogs, making them the perfect choice for someone who is looking for a true best friend. Their sensitivity makes them alert to your every need. They enjoy sitting quietly on their bed or running and playing outside. Overall, Brottweilers are a confident and caring breed that fits the lifestyle of most homeowners.

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Brottweiler Puppies – Before You Buy…

Brottweiler puppy
Image Credit: CC0 Public Domain, Pxhere

Energy:
Trainability:
Health:
Lifespan:
Sociability:

If you haven’t met a Brottweiler in person, you haven’t experienced their loving nature. Even though they love to snuggle up with you at night, they do have a lot of energy that they like to burn during the day. They always want to be by your side and are better-mannered with someone who enjoys bringing them along for the ride.

Because they are independent, it takes a firm master to train them. The earlier you teach them what behavior your find acceptable, the more likely they are to listen to commands as adults. The same rule applies to socializing them. They tend to get envious unless they’ve been around other pets and humans for a while.

Brottweilers are a wise choice if you’re genuinely interested in having a sidekick. They have a great lifespan and only a handful of health problems to keep an eye on, so don’t buy this breed unless you’re ready to commit to them.

What’s the Price of Brottweiler Puppies?

As a more modern breed, you shouldn’t expect to walk away with an adequately bred Brottweiler puppy for less than $700. The price of this dog breed varies depending on the size of the dog and their dominant features, but understand that cheaper puppies up front could have a lot more health or behavioral issues down the road and cost more in the long run.

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3 Little-Known Facts About Brottweiler

1. Their Rottweiler side was used as guard and cattle dogs.

Brottweilers are half Rottweilers, a mastiff-type dog. The Romans brought them to Germany to drive cattle and protect against thieves. Because of their muscular bodies, they also pulled heavy objects like carts of meat. Over the years, the Rottweiler side has been used for police work or work dogs on farms and ranches. This side of them makes Brottweilers calm, brave, and confident.

2. Their Brussels Griffon side was bred to hunt rodents.

As a smaller dog breed, Brussels Griffons were the perfect size to hunt vermin in the city and stables around Belgium. Over the years, they have been mixed with other species like the Pug, English Toy Spaniel, and Affenpinscher until they became the dogs we know today. They are intelligent and lively but also highly sensitive.

3. They grow a strong attachment to one person.

Because of their delicate nature, Brottweilers tend to grow extremely attached to one individual. This loyalty is sought after by many different people but can also lead to jealousy if they aren’t socialized from a young age.

The parents of the Brottweiler
Image Credit: Left: Brussels Griffon (Source: PublicDomainPictures, Pixabay), Right: Rottweiler (Source: RebeccasPictures, Pixabay)

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Brottweiler

Brottweiler breeds are intelligent and sweet. They love affection and depend on having a master who is as interested in companionship as them. They are eager to please, and early social training is the key to turning them into well-trained dogs.

With the right guidance, they are a well-behaved breed with few behavioral issues besides a bit of bit of chewing. Because Brottweilers are so fine-tuned to their environment, they don’t do well when left alone for long periods and suffer from separation anxiety.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

In general, Brottweilers make an excellent family pet, especially if there are older children in the house. Because they grow so attached to one individual, there are times where they could get insecure and envy other pets and kids who get more attention. Again, socializing them with both children and pets is crucial for them to have good behavior.

Brottweilers benefit from being in a family that spends equal time outside being active and taking time to relax indoors. They have a lot of energy, but it is easily burnt off with about an hour of playtime or a quick walk each day.

Does This Breed Get Along With Other Pets?

There are two sides to the Brottweiler and how they act depends on the individual. Their Rottweiler side is more accepting of other pets in the house. They put up with other animals being around and usually pose no problems. On the other hand, their Brussels Griffon side is a bit more protective. Individuals with more Brussels in them might be a little nervous around other animals until they get comfortable.

Brottweiler mixed dog breed
Image credit: Pixabay

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Things to Know When Owning a Brottweiler:

Having any pet to care for is a big commitment, and you should learn as much about their needs as you possibly can before taking the plunge. If you don’t think you can meet their food, exercise, grooming, and health requirements, then you might consider finding a breed that suits your lifestyle better.

Brottweiler dog
Image Credit: Myriams-Fotos, Pixabay

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

As a medium-sized breed, a lot of people don’t think that these dogs eat much, but that isn’t the case. They have a lot of energy that they burn off during the day, and most of them require three cups of food per day. This amount is slightly more than average, but it won’t cost you too much more than another breed would per month.

Expect to pay anywhere from $35 to $45 on dog food every month. That works out to an average of about $1.30 per day. Contact your veterinarian about the brand of dog food they recommend for your dog’s size and breed.

Exercise 🐕

Don’t mistake a Brottweilers desire to be by your side as them wanting to sit indoors all day. They have high energy and benefit tremendously from having a large fenced-in yard that they can run around in all day. These dogs don’t adapt well to apartment or city life and are happiest when they’re out in the country with a lot of open space.

Larger Brottweiler dogs need a little bit more activity than medium sizes. We recommend walking them over a mile per day. More activity is usually better, but don’t work them too much or you’ll exhaust them. On top of physical exercise, stimulate them mentally. This breed was created to have a job, and if they get too bored, it could lead to some destruction in the house or aggressive behavior.

Training 🎾

An owner with dog and training experience is going to have a much easier time raising these pups than someone who has never owned a pet before. Owners must clearly establish that they are in charge and set strict rules and expectations for their dog to follow. Do not bend once you’ve put these rules into place.

Brottweilers are emotional so encourage them with lots of treats and praise instead of scolding them. Even if they challenge you, try to remain patient and keep a positive attitude. Over time, the dog will accept you as their leader and get used to their new routine and demands with some consistency.

Brottweiler mutt
Image Credit: Sinawa, Pixabay

On top of obedience training, schedule times for socialization. The dog park is a fantastic place to get them around other dogs and people. They also get exposed to new situations so that they are less likely to stress out when tense problems arise in the future.

Grooming ✂️

All dogs require a little bit of grooming and maintenance, but Brottweilers won’t demand too much more than average. Brushing them once every week keeps their shedding to a minimum, though there will be a moment once per year where their shedding gets more aggressive.

A Brottweiler doesn’t need too much bathing except for once every month or two. That is, of course, unless they roll in mud or other unpleasant things outside. Overall, brushing them and even rubbing them down with a damp towel is enough to keep their coats clean.

Start brushing your dog’s teeth as a puppy so that they won’t mind as adults. Regularly check their ears to ensure there is no debris inside and that they are free from infection. Wiping the ears out with a damp cloth is fine. Clip their toenails when they get long without cutting them too short and making them bleed. Other than these standard grooming practices, there isn’t too much upkeep with these breeds.

Health and Conditions 🏥

Brottweilers are cross-bred, which makes them a little less prone to health issues than purebred dogs. Regardless, there are some conditions you should look out for and take them to the vet if you notice any usual behavior from them.

Minor Conditions
Serious Conditions
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Heart issues

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Final Thoughts

The Brottweiler breed crossed the courageous, hard-working characteristics of Rottweilers with the sensitive, loyal nature of Brussels Griffon to create a dog that is the perfect fit for someone who loves to be active during the day and have a best friend right by their side at night. They have their moments where envy and independence get in the way but are overall kind and obedient dogs with the ultimate goal of pleasing their master. As long as they have room to run in the day and a warm bed at night, these dogs will welcome you into their pack with open arms.


Featured Image Credit: 825545, Pixabay

Nicole Cosgrove

Nicole is the proud mom of Baby, a Burmese cat and Rosa, a New Zealand Huntaway. A Canadian expat, Nicole now lives on a lush forest property with her Kiwi husband in New Zealand. She has a strong love for all animals of all shapes and sizes (and particularly loves a good interspecies friendship) and wants to share her animal knowledge and other experts' knowledge with pet lovers across the globe.