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Can You Rent A Horse for A Day?

Oliver Jones

July 6, 2021

Horse riding is the ultimate definition of fun. Sitting on a horse’s back brings with it a certain freedom that words can’t sufficiently explain. Thanks to horse rentals, you do not have to break the bank to ride a horse. They provide affordable ways to experience the joy that these gracious animals offer.

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Where Can You Rent a Horse for a Day?

If you want to rent a horse for a day, your best luck lies with the commercial trail rides. But equine training facilities specializing in show jumping or dressage and private horse owners may also rent their horses.

You, however, will be required to sign a waiver of liability before the horse can be handed over to you. It’s also essential that you call ahead if your kids will accompany you. Some stables have different policies for children that spell out whether they are allowed to ride and at what age.

For stables that allow children to ride, parents/legal guardians will sign a waiver for the minors. Some facilities also allow a parent to ride the same horse with a child.

1. Trail Riding Rental

Commercial trail rides offer novice riders the best horseback riding opportunities. Here, you get a platform to familiarize yourself with horse riding in a controlled area.

It is always advisable that you first contact the rental company beforehand and inquire what their rules are. Some will not let you ride the trails unguided; others prohibit running. Most of them have a weight limit, and you also must bring your own helmet. Find out beforehand what the rules are so you can plan accordingly.

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Image Credit: frantic00, Shutterstock

Horse riding rentals are available in most locations. If rentals are not available on your favorite beach, you sure will find commercial trail rides in another area of your liking.

Guided or Unguided?

Nearly all trail horseback riding rentals come accompanied by a guide to enhance safety. The guide is an experienced horseman who knows the horse and the trails.

The guide remains with you the whole ride and will answer all your horse riding or safety questions. Remember to ask if the guide is certified anytime you are calling the facility to book your ride.

Unguided rides are rare. Hardly will a rental facility allow you to ride the horse without help from staff, and for good reasons. First, it is dangerous for beginners to ride unguided as they lack the proper knowledge of handling a horse.

Second, a lot can go wrong on unguided rides. Imagine a scenario where the horse begins to run full-tilt towards home, rejects to leave the barn, or eats grass continuously. You wouldn’t have much fun, would you?


2. Equine Training Facility Rentals

When you enroll for horse riding lessons in equine training facilities, part of what you pay for the classes covers the horse’s rental during the lessons. You can stick with the daily payment plan or opt for a monthly horse rental plan.

One thing you can be sure of is that you will become a better rider. These facilities have relaxed rules that allow you to try out different things. Perhaps you have only ridden English before; you can now give Western and dressage a try.

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Image Credit: PublicDomainPictures, Pixabay

But not so quick. Most facilities will subject you to a compulsory evaluation ride before taking a ride with one of their horses. This enables them to team you up with a suitable horse.

Single-day rentals are available in some facilities. The rules are, however, more stringent when you rent for a day. You must prove that you can ride and also sign a rental agreement and a waiver of liability.


3. Private Owner Rentals

In most cases, private owners will only rent their horses to trustworthy friends, mostly when selling a horse or for competition purposes.

The truth is, owners with a lot of horses love to offer horse rentals to riders who can take them on trail rides for the day. But they are careful to rent young horses to established horse riders only so the young horses can maintain good habits.

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Why Should You Rent a Horse?

Perhaps you do not own a horse but still want to experience the awesomeness that comes with riding one. A horse rental will definitely do you some good.

A horse rental will also benefit you if you plan to buy a horse but still do not have space for it yet. This way, you will learn to ride, groom, and tack horses before you can get one of your own.

After the rental expires, your work is done; no feeding the horse, floating the teeth, or checking the horse’s feet. That is the owner’s responsibility. Therefore, it is good that you clearly understand a horse’s maintenance costs before dropping a coin on one.

You cannot treat horse riding like any other hobby. A horse is not like a bike that you ride, then forget about it until the urge to ride again comes. Some horses require a special diet and very close care. That’s why renting a horse is a better option if you are not financially capable of meeting the horse’s needs.

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Image Credit: Innviertlerin from Pixabay

If you have not closely interacted with horses or don’t have friends who own horses, you should stick to horse rentals until you are well equipped to care for these precious animals.

Think about the feeding expenses, the vet bill, the tack costs, and the farrier costs; it is not cheap to maintain a horse. And since they thrive better in pastures, your goose is cooked if land costs an arm and a leg in your location.

How Much Does Renting a Horse Cost?

Horse rental costs depend on rental length, type of horse, time of day, and region. For instance, a rental for a horse beach ride will set you back $100 and $150 an hour for sunrise or sunset horse rides.

Some rental facilities will charge you $30 or $50, horse riding lessons included.

To Lease or Rent?

Horse leasing is like a long-term horse rental. It is an arrangement where you rent a horse and take it home to rear it as your own for a stipulated period at a specified cost.

A lease agreement must be signed between the lessor and the lessee. Some specifics spelled out in the agreement require the lessee to assume all the responsibilities and costs of rearing the horse as long as the contract is active. Some of the costs include feeding costs, vet bills, insurance, and horseshoes.

Leasing is particularly common in equine sporting events where a showjumper can lease a horse for season competitions. If the lessee wins the competition, the horse’s owner and the lessee bask in the glory of the victory.

On the other hand, renting a horse allows you to use the horse for a specified period in a day.

Half-Lease Option

This is a type of agreement where the lessor and the lessee agree to share the costs of caring for the horse and the riding time. It saves money on vet bills, board, and feeding costs and is also beneficial to the horse if you have limited saddle time.

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Image Credit: angiwalch, Pixabay

However, this is not a contract to enter verbally; it must be written to protect both you and the horse. Some basic provisions that a half-lease should capture include:

  • What type of use is permitted for the horse and what’s not
  • How the maintenance expenses will be paid
  • A schedule indicating when each person can ride or use the horse
  • An escape clause in case of interest level or party circumstances change
  • How legal issues that may arise will be addressed, and who will pay the legal costs, etc.

These are important points that must be considered to protect all parties and have a happy half-lease arrangement.

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Have Fun on Your Horse

Fun is guaranteed with your horse riding rental. Ensure to make the most out of it. Smile! Laugh! Enjoy the scenery. Nothing quite compares to viewing the world from the back of a horse. And when the animal gains speed, you are in for a ride to remember.


Featured Image Credit: olsim photo, Shutterstock

Oliver Jones

Oliver (Ollie) Jones - A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master's degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.