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Home > Dogs > Cane Corso Price: How Much Do They Cost in 2024?

Cane Corso Price: How Much Do They Cost in 2024?

male cane corso standing on a rock

Dating back to ancient Rome, the Cane Corso is still a popular bodyguard-dog today. They are massive dogs that weigh over 100 pounds but have hearts of gold. Although they’re loyal, intelligent, and eager to please, they are not for the faint-hearted, and their willful stubborn streak makes them a challenge for even experienced dog owners.

If you’ve decided to take on the challenge of owning a Cane Corso, preparing your budget is the first step to ensuring that your puppy—or adult dog—is as happy as possible.

Here, we cover the initial costs for these dogs and the necessary supplies, as well as all the monthly expenses and extras, so you can better decide whether you can afford a Cane Corso.

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Bringing Home a New Cane Corso: One-Time Costs

Getting a new Cane Corso puppy is exciting, but the initial price is often one of the most expensive parts of owning one of these dogs. There are three ways that you can welcome a new Cane Corso to your home.

Although it can be tempting to try to find a Cane Corso for free, we recommend finding one to adopt. Shelter/rescue dogs need loving homes, and although there’s an adoption fee, any veterinary expenses—like spaying or neutering—are covered by the rescue or shelter. This can save you money later.

cane corso puppy
Image Credit: Bruno Simões, Pixabay

Free

Pedigree dogs are rarely given away for free, but it can happen. While it can be tempting to only seek out free dogs, there is a downside. Although you don’t need to pay an adoption or breeder’s fee, a free dog can have a few expensive downsides, especially if you’ve never owned a dog before.


Adoption

  • $100–$600

Adoption is often the most budget-friendly option when it comes to acquiring a Cane Corso.1 Although a rescue or shelter will have an adoption fee that you’ll need to pay, it will cover any healthcare that the facility provided to the dog.

That said, it can be difficult to find a Cane Corso at your local shelter, and each facility will have different fees depending on its location and any medical expenses for the dog. On average, adoption costs between $100 and $600.


Breeder

  • $700–$5,000+

If you’ve got your heart set on a pedigree Cane Corso, your best bet is to find a breeder. A reputable breeder will cost more—$1,000 to $2,000, on average—but you’ll also be paying for the pedigree certificate and full health history.

The price that you pay depends on the breeder. Although most will be around $1,500,2 a Cane Corso from a champion line of dogs might cost anywhere between $5,000 and $8,000, if not more. Still, you’ll have the benefit of knowing that common genetic issues have been screened out of the dogs by trustworthy breeders, ensuring that your puppy is as healthy as possible.

cane-corso-pixabay
Credit: Lucie-Malouin, Pixabay

Initial Setup and Supplies

  • $100–$1,000

Unfortunately, the purchase price of your dog rarely includes the necessary supplies. If you’ve owned a dog before, a few of these items might not be necessary. However, you will still need a new collar, ID tag, and high-quality dog food to start with. All of these costs add up and should be considered in addition to the adoption or breeder’s fee.

You can offset some of this by choosing affordable but reliable supplies rather than the fanciest items that you can get. Also, the more durable your supplies are, the longer they will last.

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List of Cane Corso Care Supplies and Costs

ID Tag and Collar $10–$40
Spay/Neuter $35–$500
X-Ray Cost $75–$500
Ultrasound Cost $300–$600
Microchip $25-$60
Teeth Cleaning $50–$500
Bed $20–$400
Nail Clipper or Grinder $5–$60
Brush $5–$15
Toys $5–$50
Crate (optional) $40–$250
Food and Water Bowls $9–$100
Dog Food $15–$80

How Much Does a Cane Corso Cost per Month?

  • $50–$500 per month

Many new pet owners pay too much attention to the initial price of owning a dog and forget the ongoing costs. Your new puppy will cost more than just the breeder’s or adoption fee and the cost of the starting supplies. You’ll be spending money on your dog for the rest of their life, and many of these expenses are for the same things every month, such as food, monthly medications, and pet insurance.

brindle cane corso with uncropped ears sitting outdoors
Image Credit: Eudyptula, Shutterstock

Health Care

  • $100–$500 per month

The Cane Corso is generally a healthy breed but is prone to a few common health problems. Their healthcare will be an ongoing cost throughout their lifetime, from the first vaccinations as a puppy to any treatments that they might need for accidents and illnesses as they age.

Many dog owners find the first year to be the most expensive when it comes to healthcare for their dogs. This is due to the necessary vaccinations, veterinary visits, microchipping, and spaying or neutering surgery that most puppies need when first brought home. As they age, healthy dogs might not cost as much per month.


Food

  • $40–$100 per month

Fully grown, a Cane Corso can weigh over 100 pounds and needs plenty of food to keep them healthy. You can give them wet or dry food or a mixture of both, but this is an ongoing cost that will recur monthly.

High-quality dog food formulated for large breeds can cost anywhere between $40 and $100 a month. The amount that you spend will depend on the brand that you choose and the type of food that you prefer to feed your dog.


Grooming

  • $0–$50 per month

Hiring a professional dog groomer can save you time and keep your Cane Corso looking nice, but it’s an optional expense rather than a necessity. Trimming your Cane Corso’s nails, brushing their short double-coat, checking their ears, and brushing their teeth are all tasks that you can do at home.

Beyond the initial outlay for the supplies that you need, the grooming costs can cost as little as nothing at all if you handle your dog’s grooming needs yourself. Hiring a professional groomer, though, can cost up to $50 a month, depending on where you live.

Cane Cors
Image Credit: agutti, Pixabay

Medications and Vet Visits

  • $20–$400 per month

Even a hardy dog like the Cane Corso can have a few health problems. Regular visits to a veterinarian will help you catch the early signs of a developing illness before it becomes a problem. You won’t have to visit a vet every month, especially when your dog is healthy, but annual visits are important.

Regular checkups can cost up to $100, with emergency cases costing much more. Medications like flea-and-tick treatments are generally cheaper but can still cost anywhere between $20 and $100, depending on the brand and the type that you choose.


Pet Insurance

  • $50–$200+ per month

Larger dogs always cost more to insure, and a Cane Corso certainly isn’t going to be cheap. Your premium will depend on your dog’s age, your location, and your policy, including whether it has any add-on packages or if it’s an accident-only or accident-and-illness plan. For a Cane Corso puppy and accident-only coverage, your premium will be low, but complete coverage—including preventive care—can cost over $200 per month.


Environment Maintenance

  • $5–$50 per month

All dogs make a mess, whether it’s shedding their fur, gnawing on the furniture, or just having potty-related accidents. Keeping your home clean will be an ongoing job, and you’ll need a few supplies. These can range from poop bags for picking up after your dog in the yard or during walks to enzyme cleaners to help tackle messes in the home.

Poop bags $5–$25 per month
Enzyme cleaner $5–$30 per month
Household flea-and-tick prevention $10–$40 per month
Puppy pee pads $20–$50 per month

Cane Corso Puppy
Image Credit: Sbolotova, Shutterstock

Entertainment

  • $10–$150 per month

Toys are essential for your Cane Corso’s daily life. These dogs are notorious for chewing through most of their toys, so you’ll have to regularly replace them as your dog grows. Look for high-quality toys that are constructed with sturdy materials that can withstand tough chewers.

There are also subscription boxes available. These require a monthly fee but can help you and your dog explore different materials and types of chew toys to see which suits your dog best. Some boxes even include treats.


Total Monthly Cost of Owning a Cane Corso

  • $100–$500+ per month

Dogs aren’t cheap, and it’s not only due to the initial purchase price but also how much you have to pay per month. Food, flea-and-tick prevention, medication, vet visits, pet insurance, grooming, and toys are all things that your Cane Corso will need.

While you can handle many of your dog’s grooming needs alone and won’t need to hire a professional groomer, you still have to pay for everything else. Overall, the monthly costs can be anywhere from $50 to over $500.

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Additional Costs to Factor In

Here are a few other things for you to consider about owning a Cane Corso.

Pet Sitters and Boarding Costs

Despite how much you might want to take your dog with you on vacation, it isn’t always possible. Pet sitters or kennels are great resources for making sure your Cane Corso is cared for while you’re away, though the longer your vacation is, the higher the cost will be.

Training

The Cane Corso isn’t a dog that’s easy to train for most owners. While this shouldn’t put you off if you’ve got your heart set on one, you need to consider how to train your dog once you purchase them. Obedience training and socialization are a must, and if you can’t handle it on your own, you’ll need a professional trainer to help you. This can cost around $150 per session, if not more.

Owning a Cane Corso on a Budget

While a Cane Corso is not the cheapest dog, there’s no reason that you can’t own one even if your budget is tight. Making sure you have enough money for yourself and your dog will take work, but it is possible.

Preparing for your new puppy should start long before welcoming them into your home. Manage some of the initial outlay by purchasing the supplies that you will need months before getting your dog, and set aside funds whenever you get the chance. Whether you use a separate savings account or a jar on your bedside table, a personal dog fund will help you meet their needs for emergencies or when money gets tight.

Saving Money on Cane Corso Care

There are plenty of ways to save money on caring for your Cane Corso. Beyond doing the grooming yourself, you can save money on dog supplies. Research various toys and accessories to ensure that you purchase high-quality items that are sure to last a while. The longer you can go between replacements, the more your wallet will thank you.

Also, consider purchasing second-hand supplies. As long as they’re clean and in good condition, they’ll be just as useful as new ones.

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Conclusion

The Cane Corso is a popular breed with a hefty price tag due to their size and high desirability. It’s incredibly rare to find a pedigree Cane Corso for free, so you’ll likely have to spend at least a few hundred dollars on adoption fees if you find one at your local shelter. The most reliable option for getting a pedigree dog is to go through a breeder, which can cost anywhere from $1,000 to over $8,000 for a champion bloodline.

Buying or adopting your dog doesn’t cover the supplies that you’ll need, though. To start with, you’ll need water and food bowls, an ID tag, a collar, a dog bed, and plenty of other items, which can be an additional $100–$500. You also need to consider the ongoing costs for food, medication, veterinary visits (including any potential emergencies), pet insurance, and toys, which can cost an extra $500 a month.

Despite the steep cost of the Cane Corso, though, if you’re sure that your budget can handle the responsibility, these dogs are dedicated and loyal companions. The better care you take of them, the healthier and happier they’ll be.


Featured Image Credit: Sbolotova, Shutterstock

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