10 Hunting Dog Breeds That Don’t Shed

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We love our dogs, but we don’t like their shedding, especially if you have a pooch like a Golden Retriever. Fortunately, there are several breeds that shed minimally. It varies widely with the pet. Some are seasonal shedders. Others will lose hair throughout the year. There is one time when all canine, regardless of breed, will shed—transitioning to their adult coat.

Bear in mind that some hair loss is normal, not unlike people. It’s just the amount and degree that differ. Of course, feeding your dog a high-quality diet is imperative to keep his coat in good shape. Besides, your hunter needs adequate nutrition to perform his best in the field. If you want a low-maintenance breed, continue reading to learn about some excellent choices for pets to make your life easier.

10 Hunting Dog Breeds That Don’t Shed

1. Standard Poodle

Standard Poodle
Photo credit: digitalskennedy, Pixabay

Hunting is probably not the first thing you may associate with the elegant Standard Poodle. He is an adept retriever, thanks to his keen intelligence. His signature cut was just as practical as it was classic Poodle. It allows the clever canine to swim through the water better and keep the pooch warm. Even if the Standard Poodle wasn’t a hunting dog, he’s still a charmer with his happy face.


2. Pudelpointer

Pudelpointer in snow
Image Credit: Chamois huntress, Shutterstock

The Pudelpointer is a cross between a Poodle and a Pointer. That makes him a natural in the field. They have a strong prey drive and excellent retrieving skills for upland game. While uncommon in the United States, these dogs have been on the hunt in Germany since the last 19th century. One look at his face, and it’s a sure bet that the Pudelpointer will get a stronger following soon.


3. Barbet

Barbet
Photo credit: Barbet suka by Pleple2000

The dense coat of the Barbet is deceptive. This friendly, French water dog is low-shedding that only needs a brush through his fur to prevent mats. Like many European breeds, including the Vizsla, this lovable pooch almost became extinct during World War II. Thanks for the efforts of enthusiasts, the Barbet continues to win hearts today.


4. Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

wirehaired pointer griffon
Image Credit: Cat Simpson, Shutterstock

From his webbed toes to his keen hunting skills, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is an ideal hunting dog. He is as athletic as he is loyal. The breed’s history goes back to the mid 16th century, where he got his sporting start early on in his development. He is a hardworking pooch that takes his job tracking and retrieving seriously. Stripping his coat with a shedding blade will keep it in good shape.


5. Portuguese Water Dog

portuguese water dog
Image Credit: Zadranka, Shutterstock

At first glance, you might not think that the Portuguese Water Dog is suited for outdoor life. This tough and adventurous pooch is anything but shy. He gets his name from his job working on fishing boats. The breed’s history is ancient, with evidence suggesting that this affectionate pup was around and adored back to pre-Christian times.


6. Black and Tan Coonhound

Black and Tan Coonhound
Photo credit: Acmecanine, Pixabay

Hunters looking for a laid-back yet steadfast companion need look no further than the Black and Tan Coonhound. They are lovable dogs that are just as happy in the field as they are curling at your feet. He is an all-American breed that counts Foxhounds among his kin. This pooch is a tenacious tracker with a high prey drive and a sense of wanderlust.


7. Irish Water Spaniel

Irish Water Spaniel
Photo credit: Irish Water Spaniel by Canarian

Everything you need to know about the Irish Water Spaniel, you can get with one look into his cute brown eyes. He is a playful pooch, ready to take to the hunt with little encouragement. Though he looks like a Poodle, the two breeds aren’t related. As his name implies, he hails from Ireland. He is well-suited to his job, with an excellent ability to handle chilly waters hunting waterfowl.


8. Lagotto Romagnolo

Lagotto Romagnolo
Photo credit: Cemmerton, Pixabay

Hunting doesn’t just mean upland game or waterfowl. This Italian cutie is known for going after a very different quarry, truffles. The Lagotto Romagnolo started as a retriever before finding his true talent. They are unassuming and affectionate companions both at home and in the field. Of course, the pooch has an incredible sense of smell.


9. Cirneco dell’Etna

Cirneco dell’Etna
Photo credit: Cirneco dell Etna by Jan Eduard licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 International license.

The Cirneco dell’Etna is the second of our low-shedding breed from Italy. Everything about this sighthound says speed. He is both agile and athletic. He is a companion that will keep up with the hunt the entire day. Though he is affectionate, he has a willful streak. He has a strong prey drive for one of his favorite quarries, rabbits. This pooch is both low-maintenance and long-lived.


10. Hamiltonstovare

Hamiltonstovare
Photo credit: Hamiltonstovare by sannse

While the name, Hamiltonstovare, doesn’t quite roll off the tongues, these dogs have a lot to offer the hunter. Their intelligence and agility make them a worthy companion. These Swedish scent hounds are jacks of all trade. They are easygoing and low-maintenance, too. They are in the Foundation Stock Service, which puts them well on the path to official American Kennel Club (AKC) recognition.


Final Thoughts

A hunting dog that is low-shedding is a fabulous find for the outdoorsman. Luckily, you’ll find plenty of breeds that fit the bill. The fact that they are also excellent and loyal companions in the field put the icing on the cake. Our roundup of sporting pooches shows the broad range of choices, whether you need an all-purpose gundog or a water-loving retriever.


Featured image credit: Igor Normann, Shutterstock