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8 Fluffy, Long-Haired Cow Breeds: An Overview (with Pictures)

Scottish highland cow grazing

If you are looking to purchase a new cow for your property or are just looking to learn more about the different breeds, it can help to sort them into different categories to make them easier to compare. Right now, we will look at several long-haired breeds to help you see what the differences are between these cows and help you narrow your search. For each kind, we’ll give you a summary telling you a little bit about it along with an image so you can see what it looks like to help you make an informed purchase. First we’ll start with the long haired cow breed before continuing on with the furry cow breeds.

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Long Haired Cow Breeds

1. Highlander

highland cattle in field
Image Credit: RonBerg, Pixabay
Height: 48 inches
Weight: 1,800 pounds

If you were looking for long-haired cattle, you don’t need to look any further than Highlander. These cows are from Scotland, and no one is quite sure of their exact origin. It has the longest hair of all cows, and it’s immense, often growing to nearly four feet tall and weighing more than 1,500 pounds. Some mature bulls can weigh as much as 1,800 pounds. As you might have guessed, Highlander cattle can withstand extreme cold indoor suitable for areas like Norway and Canada. The meat is low in cholesterol, and it can thrive on a poor pasture.

Furry Cow Breeds

2. Belted Galloway

Belted Galloway
Image Credit: meunierd, Shutterstock
Height: 48 inches
Weight: 1,800 pounds

The Belted Galloway is the first furry cow breed on our list, and it’s also from Scotland, as the long-haired Highlander. This is a naturally polled breed which means it doesn’t have horns, and its fuzzy appearance causes many people to keep them for ornamentation, though they are popular for their marbled meat. It has a soft undercoat that provides thermal insulation and waterproofing, allowing it to withstand extremely cold temperatures. Bulls can weigh as much as 2,300 pounds and average about 1,800, while the cows average 1,250.

3. Chillingham

Height: 43 inches
Weight: 625 pounds

Chillingham Wild Cattle are a breed of fuzzy cows that live in an enclosed park in Chillingham Castle, England. These are smaller cattle with upright horns that typically weigh a little over 600 pounds. These cows are not tamed in any way and behave like wild animals, so this is one breed you will not be able to purchase for the farm.

4. Galloway

galloway cattle
Image Credit: John De Winter,Shutterstock
Height: 49 inches
Weight: 2,300 pounds

The Galloway cattle is one of the world’s oldest established breeds. It originated in Scotland back in the 17th century, and it’s a fuzzy black, red, or dun cow that can weigh as much as 2,300 pounds. It has a thick double coat that helps it survive cold temperatures, and it’s popular for its meat production.

5. Luing

Height: 55 inches
Weight: 2000 pounds

The Luing breed is from the Luing Island, and it’s a mixed breed with the Highlander and the Beef Shorthorn as parents. It was first created in 1947 and was the first new cattle breed in Britain in more than 100 years. They have a long lifespan and can give birth through as many as ten calves in a lifetime, and it’s a popular breed for its flavorful meat.

6. Shetland

Shetland cattle
Image Credit: Jordon Sharp, Shutterstock
Height: 48 inches
Weight: 1,300 pounds

The Shetland is another Scottish cow that has black and white markings. They are smaller than many other breeds, with the bulls usually weighing no more than 1,300 pounds. Their fur coat helps protect them from cold temperatures, and its primary use is to provide meat. Farmers like them because they are low maintenance.

Related Read: 15 Fascinating and Fun Cow Facts You Never Knew

7. South Devon

South Devon cattle
Image Credit: Eric Buermeyer,Shutterstock
Height: 49 inches
Weight: 2,500 pounds

South Devon cattle are a large breed from southwest England primarily used for food. Farmers used to use it as a draught animal, and it also produced milk and meats. However, its udders are not well suited to mechanical milking, so it became a meat-only animal in the 1970s. It’s very fast-growing, and adults often reach 49 inches tall, weighing more than 2,500 pounds

8. Whitebred Shorthorn

Whitebred Shorthorn
Image Credit: Andrew Roland, Shutterstock
Height: 49 inches
Weight: 2,000 pounds

The Whitebread Shorthorn is a British cow with a fluffy appearance. These cows produce meat with a good flavor, and breeders mix the Whitebred Shorthorn with Black Galloway cows to produce the Blue Grey hybrid, which is popular in both Europe and Scotland de to their ability to eat coarse grasses, which are prevalent in these areas.hoof print divider

Summary

As you can see, there are quite a few long-haired and fuzzy cattle breeds. These cows are well suited to cold weather, and many are willing to eat the rough and sparse grasses that grow in this area, allowing farmers to produce more milk and cheese with fewer resources. Many of these cows are large, which means they can double as a draught horse if you need them to, and even though many are primarily for producing meat, you can still use them for producing milk if you prefer, and most will do a good job.

We hope you enjoyed reading this short guide and found a few breeds you would like to try out. If we have helped you choose your next farm addition, please share this guide to fluffy, long-haired cow breeds on Facebook and Twitter.


Featured Image Credit: Stelogic, Pixabay

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