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Old Danish Pointer

Oliver Jones

Height: 20 – 24 inches
Weight: 57 – 77 pounds
Lifespan: 12 – 14 years
Colors: White with large brown spots and small brown specks
Suitable for: Families with children, singles, and experienced owners
Temperament: Family-friendly, hardworking, gentle, gets along with other pets

The Old Danish Pointer is a medium-sized dog that was bred for hunting. It is believed the breed was created by crossing gypsy dogs and farm dogs from Denmark, thus this breed has been in existence since 1710. Some dispute these origins, however, due to the dislike of gypsy dogs at the time.

Although this dog is not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), they have grown in popularity in places such as Denmark, Germany, Holland, and Sweden. Still considered a rare dog breed, the Old Danish Pointer is a strong dog with a short coat and a loose dewlap.

While they may have originally bred for hunting, the gentle temperament of this breed has made it a house dog. If you’d like to learn more about this breed and decide whether one is right for you, read on below to uncover the truth about Old Danish Pointers.

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Old Danish Pointer Puppies – Before You Buy…

Understanding the characteristics of the Old Danish Pointers is important before you purchase a puppy. A strong and sturdy dog, the Old Danish Pointer is mild-mannered when inside the home but lets loose when they find themselves in the great outdoors. Take a look at what you might expect when bringing one of these puppies into your home.

Energy:
Trainability:
Health:
Lifespan:
Sociability:

What’s the Price of Old Danish Pointer Puppies?

Old Danish Pointer pups are considered quite rare. While there are reputable breeders out there who sell these pups for around $1,000, the likelihood that you can get one immediately is unlikely. If you truly want one of these pups, you’ll most likely spend time on the breeder’s waiting list.

If waiting isn’t your thing, you can always check local rescues and animal shelters. If you find an Old Danish Pointer in one of these locations, you will avoid spending huge amounts of money. In most situations, shelters and rescues charge anywhere from $50 to $400 for dog adoptions.

Keep in mind, there is more to bringing home a new pup than simply paying the prices asked by the breeders. Check-ups for your new pup, a dog bed, a crate, and the right puppy food are all required before you take your new pup home.

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3 Little-Known Facts About Old Danish Pointers

You may think you know the Old Danish Pointer, but these dogs have an interesting history. Here’s a look at 3 facts you may not have known about this dog breed.

1. They Have Their Own Breeding Club

Although they aren’t officially recognized by the AKC, Old Danish Pointers do have a breeding club. In 1947, this club was formed in Denmark. They hoped to save the breed from dwindling numbers.

2. A Television Series Helped the Breed

As the number of Old Danish Pointers went down, a nature show on television made people want this dog breed again. The show, En Naturlig Forklaring, featured a dog of this breed called Balder. People’s love of the dog on the show made them interested in this breed again.

3. The United Kennel Club Accepted

While the Old Danish Pointer may not be part of the AKC, it is part of the United Kennel Club. This club opened its arms to this breed in 2006.

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Old Danish Pointer

This breed of dog is well-known for its calm attitude. They are very well-behaved when living inside the home and have adjusted well to living with people. This breed is also well-known for its need for social interaction. This breed may bore easily, leaving you responsible for keeping your pet’s mind occupied with playtime and adventures.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

Yes, these dogs do quite well with families. Their calm nature makes the Old Danish Pointer a great companion for kids. Their need for companionship makes them great for families who spend time at home and owners who live active, on-the-go lifestyles.

 

Does This Breed Get Along with Other Pets?

Yes, the Old Danish Pointer is great with other pets when socialized correctly. This socialization should take place early, however. It is also best not to introduce the Old Danish Pointer into a home where pet birds are present. Due to their hunting history, they could show aggression in these situations.

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Things to Know When Owning an Old Danish Pointer:

While the Old Danish Pointer is a great dog overall, it is best to know exactly what you’re getting into when bringing this dog breed into your home.

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

This dog has a healthy appetite. To keep them happy and healthy, you should provide them with at least 3 to 4 cups of high-quality dog food. Their food should be split into two feedings to ensure they aren’t hungry throughout the day.

Keep in mind, these food serving sizes may change due to your dog’s activity level, size, age, and metabolism. Always provide them with fresh, clean water throughout the day. This is especially important when they are being active.

Exercise 🐕

The Old Danish Pointer is a very active dog breed. It is best to have a large backyard or area where they can play. Long, brisk walks will help them stay on top of their exercise as well. Taking time throughout your day to engage these dogs in active play and mental stimulation is a must. The Old Danish Pointer doesn’t like feeling bored.

Training 🎾

These dogs are known for their intelligence but still require a firm hand. During training, keep things engaging and fun. This will help your dog focus and interact better. Old Danish Pointers do great with treat rewards, positive reinforcement, and lots of praise when training. This dog breed should also be trained with socialization. If they learn how to interact with other dogs, people, and situations they will be more confident.

Grooming ✂️

The grooming requirements for the Old Danish Pointer are relatively simple. These dogs require brushing a couple of times a week to help with their low-level shedding. Being wiped down with a hound mitt also helps give their coats shine in between bathings. These baths should be given when needed and with only proper dog shampoos.

Your dog’s ears also need to be cleaned and checked weekly. This is to help avoid ear infections. Cleaning with a damp cloth will help avoid dirt build-up. While doing ear care, take the time to check your dog’s nails. If they haven’t shortened them due to their play, take the time to trim their nails properly. Remember to avoid cutting the nails to the quick, which will cause your dog pain and bleeding.

Your dog’s oral hygiene should be paid close attention to. By using a dog toothbrush and brushing your dog’s teeth several times a week, you can help them avoid toothaches or other dental problems. If you start this routine early, your dog will become accustomed to it.

Health and Conditions 🏥

This breed of dog is quite healthy. Other than field-related injuries they aren’t prone to many major issues. Always take your pet to their routine veterinarian visits to ensure they stay healthy.

Minor Conditions
  • Eye Issues
  • Ear Infections
Serious Conditions

Male vs Female

In general, the only difference between male and female Old Danish Pointers is their size. Males are larger and stronger overall when compared to females. If you are debating between a female or male, simply follow your preference unless you need a smaller built dog.

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Final Thoughts

The Old Danish Pointer is a rare breed that can make a great pet. While their roots may be in the world of hunting, this even-tempered and active dog can fill any family’s heart. If you have the time and energy to devote to one of these dogs, bringing one home could make your life complete.


Featured Image Credit: Lavrsen, Shutterstock

Oliver Jones

Oliver (Ollie) Jones - A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master's degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.