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11 Safe Materials for Making DIY Bird Toys

Oliver Jones

Birds are active and playful pets. They are highly intelligent and require a great amount of mental stimulation through human interaction and socialization, exercise, and play.

Bird owners are well aware that birds love their toys. They tend to be a bit harsh on their toys and frequently chew and tear them apart. The more a bird enjoys a toy, the quicker it is destroyed and will need to be replaced.

Constantly buying bird toys from the pet store can get a bit expensive. By opting for Do-It-Yourself projects, you can use your creativity to construct toys at home. Below is a list of safe materials you can use for making DIY bird toys.

divider-birdsSafe Materials for Bird Toys

1. Acrylic

Acrylic_Pixabay
Image Credit: bodobe, Pixabay

Acrylic makes for great material in DIY bird toy projects. It’s generally safe and indestructible. You’ll want to make sure the acrylic is appropriately sized and there are no sharp edges to prevent any choking hazards or injury.


2. Bells

Bells_Pixabay
Image Credit: qimono, Pixabay

Birds love to make noises and bells are a great option for a DIY bird toy. You will need to make sure the bell is appropriately sized and the clapper inside the bell cannot be removed, this could be a choking hazard otherwise.


3. Cable Ties

Paper Tie_Pixabay
Image Credit: PublicDomainPictures, Pixabay

Cable ties are very strong and hard to break so can be used to hold bundles of things together which your bird can play with.


4. Cardboard

Cardboard_Pixabay
Image Credit: stux, Pixabay

You get a lot of excess packaging in item deliveries these days, but instead of just throwing it away this can be used for bird toys. The cardboard cylinder from a toilet paper or paper towel roll is ideal for birds to chew and shred upon.

Also, they can be easily combined with other items when making other toys for your pet bird. Another type of cardboard box that can be easily turned into a bird toy is an egg carton


5. Curtain Rings

Curtain Rings_Pixabay
Image Credit: chnny10, Pixabay

Excellent pre-made rings that can be adapted into your homemade bird toy.


6. Paper

Paper_Pixabay
Image Credit: 6689062 , Pixabay

A simple piece of paper can seem boring to a human but it might be able to keep your pet parrot entertained. Simply hanging a few pieces from the cage gives your birds something for them to shed.

If you want to take it to the next level then you can use your origami skills to make many different toys that will keep your birds entertained. Birds love ripping their way through old yellow pages and any old books which you’re never going to read again.


7. Rings

When using rings as part of your bird’s toys, you’ll want to ensure they are appropriately sized for your bird. Birds could choke or get their heads caught if the wrong size is used. Multiple rings could result in an entanglement that could prove dangerous for your bird. Rings are safe but do use caution.


8. Ropes

Ropes_Pixabay
Image Credit: schuetz-mediendesign, Pixabay

Ropes are great on their own or for hanging other toys and items. You can get very creative with ropes and your bird will thoroughly enjoy it. The ideal rope is derived from 100 percent natural fibers such as sisal, hemp, or cotton.


9. Sewing Spool

Sewing Spool_Pixabay
Image Credit: Bru-nO, Pixabay

Your birds get to play with the sewing string/yarn and also the wooden spool itself.


10. Shoelaces

Shoelaces_Pixabay
Image Credit: congerdesign, Pixabay

Strong enough to hold the weight of most small toys and also a very common item that most owners will already have.


11. Vegetable-tanned Leather

Leather is safe to use as it is vegetable-tanned leather. Birds will love to chew and play with leather-based toys. It is essential to avoid leather that contains any chemicals or dyes.


Featured Image Credit: bilgecangurer, Pixabay

Oliver Jones

Oliver (Ollie) Jones - A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master's degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.