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35 Siberian Husky Mixes

Oliver Jones

The Siberian Husky has become an increasingly popular pet. It is lively and energetic, full of character, and has one of the most distinctive and recognizable stares in the canine world.

However, this Siberian breed is also easily bored, prone to destructiveness when left alone, and enjoys wandering. Hybrid breeds combine the Husky with any of a wide range of other breeds, often in a bid to quell some of the more challenging behaviors but sometimes to improve or alter the aesthetic look of the dog.

Below are 35 common and most appealing Siberian Husky mixes to help you choose the one that best fits your lifestyle and your home.

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35 Siberian Husky Mixes

1. Huskita (Siberian Husky x Akita)

huskita lying on the ground
Image Credit: New Digital Age Media, Shutterstock

The Huskita combines the Husky with the Akita: a fiercely loyal but somewhat independent breed. The ancient Akita breed is known for being clean and tidy, which may be somewhat at odds with the Husky’s more haphazard approach to life, especially around the dinner bowl.

This hybrid is best reserved for experienced owners. They are a large cross, often weighing 100 pounds or more, and they need firm but fair handling and training.


2. Alusky (Siberian Husky x Alaskan Malamute)

alusky on green grass
Image Credit: Anna Krivitskaya, Shutterstock

The combination of two sledding breeds makes the Alusky, which crosses with the Alaskan Malamute, a four-legged running machine. You will find it very difficult to tire this breed out, but it would make a suitable breed for outdoor and adventure-loving owners.

The hybrid is also noteworthy for its love of the cold. The parent breeds come from Alaska and Siberia, and the cross will not tolerate hot weather exercise.


3. Huskimo (Siberian Husky x American Eskimo)

The Huskimo is another active hybrid breed. It will befriend and form a close bond with all family members, and it may settle down for cuddles on the sofa occasionally, but it will prefer to be out in the park and letting off steam.

The high energy levels of the dog also mean that it can be difficult to train. You will need to put in extra effort to ensure that it is paying attention and listening to your commands. If you can keep training fun, turn it into a game, and make it energy-intensive, you will improve your chance of successful training.


4. Ausky (Siberian Husky x Australian Cattle Dog)

The Blue Heeler, or Australian Cattle Dog, is happy to work in the fields all day long. As well as being very active, it is a highly intelligent herding dog, and this is another hybrid breed that requires ongoing and positive training, as well as a lot of daily exercise.

The heeler breed is so-called because it nips at the heels of cattle to keep them in line and to direct them. Training will prevent this vocal dog from using similar tactics on young family members and small animals.


5. Aussie Husky (Siberian Husky x Australian Shepherd)

The Australian Shepherd requires a lot of space and a ton of time if you want any hope of burning off the excess energy.

The cross has a distinctive look that will grab attention and attract glances, and the Aussie Husky makes a more than capable herding or working dog. The hybrid would benefit from having ongoing tasks to do.


6. Beaski (Siberian Husky x Beagle)

The Beaski combines the energetic nature of the Husky with the more laid-back attitude of the Beagle. Although it will depend on the individual dog, most Beaskis tend to be relaxed at home but active when out and about.

Training will be a difficult aspect of owning this hybrid. Be consistent, keep training sessions relatively short to avoid fatigue, and be prepared to put in the hours.


7. Belusky (Siberian Husky x Belgian Malinois)

The Belgian Malinois is utilized as a police dog, rescue dog, and military dog. It is intelligent, brave, and brimming with energy.

Where the Malinois enjoys pleasing its people, the Husky is less inclined to want to make you happy, and the hybrid is likely to fall somewhere between the two breeds. Yours will be intelligent, but it may not be overly concerned with satisfying its owner.


8. Bernese Husky (Siberian Husky x Bernese Mountain Dog)

The Bernese Mountain Dog is a giant breed and this could be why the Bernese Husky is one of few hybrids that tend to favor the physical appearance of the non-Husky parent.

This rare hybrid will enjoy spending time outdoors and will need plenty of exercise. Like a lot of Husky hybrids, you should not spend too much time outdoors in hot climates.


9. Husky Collie (Siberian Husky x Border Collie)

Husky Collie in snow
Image Credit: a4ndreas, Shutterstock

The Border Collie Husky mix, commonly referred to as the Husky Collie, combines the intelligence and stamina of the Border Collie, which is arguably the most intelligent of all dog breeds, with the stamina and occasionally stubborn nature of the Husky.

Ensure regular physical exercise for this hybrid, and find ways in which to keep it mentally entertained, if you want to avoid destructive and antisocial behavior from your dog.


10. Siberian Boston (Siberian Husky x Boston Terrier)

The Siberian Boston is one of the smaller Husky hybrids, thanks to its Boston Terrier parentage. The resulting cross is bright like the Husky and keen to please its family, like the doting Boston Terrier.

Prone to separation anxiety, the Siberian Boston does still have a decent energy level, so will require some regular exercise, but it does not have the same high demands as the Husky.


11. Boxsky (Siberian Husky x Boxer)

Boxsky lying on the ground
Image Credit: Helena Franck, Shutterstock

Boxers are renowned for being characterful, at best, and a bit mad, at worst. They do love their humans but they take a lot of work. This can also transfer to the Boxsky hybrid. Provide a lot of exercise, ensure that you offer mental stimulation, and socialize and train your Boxsky from a young age.


12. Husky-Chi (Siberian Husky x Chihuahua)

Husky-Chi outdoor tongue out
Image Credit: Photolococapture, Shutterstock

The Husky-Shi is larger than a Chihuahua but has many of the same attributes. It tends to yap, still believes it is much bigger than it is, but it is a good choice for families with children, although young children should be supervised with the dog.


13. Chowsky (Siberian Husky x Chow Chow)

Chowsky lying on hay grass
Image Credit: Juan_melendez79, Shutterstock

This combination of Chow Chow and Husky is a stocky and stubborn dog that will take a lot of training and patience. Its dense coat means that it will also take a lot of regular grooming to ensure that the hybrid is comfortable, not too hot, and doesn’t shed constantly.


14. Siberian Cocker (Siberian Husky x Cocker Spaniel)

The Siberian Cocker has a Cocker Spaniel parent and could have the wavy coat of the Spaniel or the double coat of the Husky. The resulting cross tends to be quite a sensible dog that is less prone to moments of madness than the Husky parent. They are medium-sized breeds, too, rather than the larger Husky.


15. Dusky (Siberian Husky x Dachshund)

The Dusky combines the temperament of the Husky with the loving and playful nature, and shorter legs, of the Dachshund. It is an unusual-looking hybrid but be prepared for a dog that chases cats and smaller animals because this hybrid has a high prey drive.


16. Dalmatian Husky (Siberian Husky x Dalmatian)

The Dalmatian was bred for hunting and retains much of its hunting skill, even when combined with the Husky. This hybrid can suffer separation anxiety, though, so start training your cross when it is young if you will be going out to work and leaving it home alone.


17. Dobsky (Siberian Husky x Doberman)

The Doberman is quite different from the Husky. It is a renowned guard dog, unlike the Husky who will befriend almost anybody. You should find a hybrid that gets along with family and friends but will warn you of strangers and potential threats.


18. Muskiff (Siberian Husky x English Mastiff)

The English Mastiff is a large and heavy dog and although this size is somewhat tempered by crossing it with the Husky, you can still expect a large dog. Fortunately, the resulting hybrid is usually a friendly dog, but it will require training and early socialization to be sure.


19. Gerberian Shepsky (Siberian Husky x German Shepherd)

Gerberian Shepsky_Ovidiu Constantin Moraru_Shutterstock
Image Credit: Ovidiu Constantin Moraru, Shutterstock

The German Shepherd is one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. It is kept as a pet, as well as a guard dog, protection dog, and for a host of other uses The Gerberian Shepsky has the friendliness of the Husky and the alert watchfulness of the German Shepherd.


20. Goberian (Siberian Husky x Golden Retriever)

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Image Credit: nokturn, Shutterstock

The Golden Retriever is another very popular breed, typically kept as a pet but also used as a therapy dog, a guide dog, and even as a search and rescue dog. The combination of these two breeds results in a Husky that is, like the Golden Retriever parent, easier to train and keep.


21. Great Danesky (Siberian Husky x Great Dane)

The Great Dane is known for being a gentle giant. It is a massive breed but is inherently gentle around smaller animals and children. The mixed breed is basically a Husky on much longer legs.


22. Pyrenees Husky (Siberian Husky x Great Pyrenees)

Pyrenees Husky standing outdoor
Image Credit: Basia_Chmielarczyk, Shutterstock

The Great Pyrenees is a large, fluffy dog, that looks as much like a teddy bear as it does a dog. If you thought the Husky’s coat was difficult to look after and required a lot of grooming, it has nothing on the Pyrenees, and you can expect to spend plenty of time with a grooming brush in hand.


23. Grey Houndsky (Siberian Husky x Italian Greyhound)

The Italian Greyhound is leggy and slender. The Husky is robust and tough. This isn’t the only way in which the two breeds differ. The Greyhound is eager to please and listens to commands. The Husky, less so. Huskies are all stamina while Greyhounds are insanely fast but only for a short period. The Grey Houndsky can be a lively and energetic mix of the two.


24. Husky Jack (Siberian Husky x Jack Russell)

husky jack_Jan Ziegler_Shutterstock
Image Credit: Jan Ziegler, Shutterstock

The Jack Russell might be small but it is insanely active and packed with character. The Husky Jack is equally demanding and this is one hybrid that will benefit from having plenty of outdoor space, as well as regular exercise, to ensure that it can burn off all that pent-up energy.


25. Labsky (Siberian Husky x Labrador Retriever)

Labsky lying on wooden floor
Image Credit: Ellice Ford, Shutterstock

Along with the Golden Retriever, the Labrador Retriever makes one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. It is not only popular for its friendly and slightly goofy nature, but for its ability to pick up commands and its desire to follow them. The Labsky can result in a Husky that is more easily controlled, which many owners will view as a positive attribute.


26. Pitsky (Siberian Husky x Pitbull)

a pitsky staring at something outside
Image Credit: AllisonJ7, Shutterstock

The Pitbull Husky loves to have fun and enjoy itself, and it wants a family that will help it do that. The problem with the Pitsky is that it won’t know when to stop. It has the energy and stamina of the Husky so it will continue to charge around longer than the Pitbull would muster.


27. Pomsky (Siberian Husky x Pomeranian)

Pomsky
Image Credit: Bolyuk Studio, Shutterstock

The Pomsky is another hybrid that shrinks the Husky’s physical size but maintains its mental character and its emotional nature. The resulting Pomsky is a small dog and because of the combination of difficult parent breeds, it will itself be difficult to train.


28. Huskydoodle (Siberian Husky x Poodle)

Huskydoodle sitting cemented ground
Image Credit: TanyaCPhotography, Shutterstock

Along with the Collie, the Poodle is thought of as being the most intelligent dog breed. It can be trained to fulfill most tasks. What’s more, it is often said to be hypoallergenic because it causes fewer allergic reactions even in allergy sufferers. The Huskydoodle will shed, but not as often as the Husky, and you can choose a hybrid that ranges in size from that of the Toy Poodle to the Standard Poodle.


29. Hug (Siberian Husky x Pug)

The Pug is a joyful little character. The Pug Husky is just as much fun. If it has the brachycephalic, flat face, of the pug, keep exercise to a minimum so as not to cause breathing difficulties in your Hug.


30. Rottsky (Siberian Husky x Rottweiler)

Rottsky with bandana running outside
Image Credit: Geartooth Productions, Shutterstock

Like the Doberman, the Rottweiler is world-renowned for its skill as a guard dog, and this is why it has been combined with the Husky. The resulting Rottsky will be a little warier of strangers but should be friendly with family members. It will be friendly with family and should not require as much exercise as the Husky parent breed.


31. Samusky (Siberian Husky x Samoyed)

Samusky lying on grass looking up
Image Credit: LNbjors, Shutterstock

The Samoyed is a medium dog. Despite looking like a teddy, it was bred for herding and excelled at this task. You can expect the hybrid to require a lot of grooming and you will need to keep the Samusky out of warm temperatures and hot climates because both parents prefer the cold.


32. Sharberian Husky (Siberian Husky x Shar-Pei)

The Shar-Pei is best known for its small ears, and the Sharberian Husky could result in a Husky-type dog with the same ears. In either case, the cross should be good with children and other animals, and it will take to strangers as well as family.


33. Shiba Inu Husky (Siberian Husky x Shiba Inu)

Shiba Inu Husky mix face closeup
Image Credit: paigerowe, Shutterstock

The Shiba Inu is a medium dog, being smaller than its Husky parent. They can be quite fierce, and unforgiving, however, so they should only be kept by experienced Shiba handlers and are not suitable for novice dog keepers.


34. Shih Tzusky (Siberian Husky x Shih Tzu)

The Shih Tzu is a small companion dog that has a lot of hair for its size. The Shih Tzusky is larger, has a lot of hair, and while it will require some exercise and routine, it will very much enjoy time with its human family and owner.


35. Siborgi (Siberian Husky x Welsh Corgi)

The Welsh Corgi shares some similar attributes to the Dachshund cross, in that it has short legs. It is also a loving companion. Larger examples will enjoy plenty of exercise. Smaller examples may be happier sat at home with their owner.

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Husky Mixes

The Husky is a popular breed, but it does require a lot of attention and work. It needs plenty of exercise, benefits from having outdoor space, and does like being on top of things. The mixes above combine the beauty and the beautiful nature of the Husky with attributes of other breeds to create some of the most unique and incredible Husky mixes.


Featured Image Credit: Ovidiu Constantin Moraru, Shutterstock

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Oliver Jones

Oliver (Ollie) Jones - A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master's degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.