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9 Spiders Found in Texas

Nicole Cosgrove

The state of Texas is home to many different types of spiders, but two varieties are most common: Huntsman Spiders and the Brown Recluse pose a potential threat to humans, with the latter being more dangerous.

The good news for Texans is that these creatures typically do not enter homes or other buildings searching for prey. However, if they find themselves inside a residence, they will usually stay where they found shelter rather than wander around looking for food like some other type of Spider.

Consequently, it’s important to make sure your house is sealed up tightly so as not to invite any unwanted guests!

new spider divider

Top 9 Spiders Found in Texas:

1. Long-Bodied Cellar Spider

Species: Pholcus phalangioides
Longevity: 2 – 3 years
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ¼ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The Long-Bodied Cellar Spider belongs to a subfamily of spiders known as the mygalomorphs, found all over North America. They are characterized by their thick, heavy bodies and powerful jaws to catch and eat their prey.

The color of these spiders varies from dark brown or black, with light yellow stripes on its head or faces. They live in dark and moist environments.

Because these spiders live near the ground, they are often found inside homes or buildings. They may be seen on walls that are close to the floor because that is where this spider usually hunts for its food. This Spider will also move around inside the home when they are searching for food or water.


2. Crab Spider

Flower Crab Spider
Image Credit: jggrz, Pixabay
Species: Thomisidae
Longevity: 1 – 2 years
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ½ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The Crab Spider is characterized by its eight eyes and spindly legs with lighter colored bands on the top of their bodies. These spiders have two sets of fangs – one set injects venom into prey, while the second set breaks open eggs as a form of food. The Crab Spider is also known as the Flower Spider because they are often seen in fields of flowers or on plants where they can catch their prey.


3. Grey Wall Jumping Spider

Menemerus bivittatus 27138620
Menemerus bivittatus 27138620 (Image Credit: portioid, Wikimedia Commons CC SA 4.0 International)
Species: Menemerus bivittatus
Longevity: 1 year
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ⅓ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The Grey Wall Jumping Spider has a slender body and long legs- it looks like an orb weaver with vertical stripes on its abdomen. This spider does not have any venom, but it will bite if it feels threatened. This spider is found on fences, walls, and plants in sunny areas.


4. Brown Recluse Spider

Brown Recluse Spider_Nick626_Shutterstock
Image Credit: Nick626, Shutterstock
Species: Loxosceles reclusa
Longevity: 1 – 2 years
Good to own as a pet?: No
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ¼ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

This spider has a violin-shaped marking on its back that can vary from tan to dark brown or black shades of red. Brown Recluse Spiders are often found inside homes because they seek out cool places to live. They are usually found at ground level, but they may climb to higher locations when searching for food or looking for a mate. Brown Recluse spider venom is highly toxic and deadly if not treated with care in time.


5. Black Widow Spider

Southern Black Widow Spider closeup_Liz Weber_Shutterstock
Image Credit: Liz Weber, Shutterstock
Species: Latrodectus
Longevity: 1 – 3 years
Good to own as a pet?: No
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ½ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

It gets its name from the female spiders that eat their mates after mating. The Black Widow Spiders are often found in dark and moist places. They have a shiny black body with an orange or red hourglass marking on their abdomen. These spiders also produce venom that is harmful to humans—if they bite someone, it will cause considerable pain.


6. Carolina Wolf Spider

Hogna carolinensis female PEM
Hogna carolinensis female PEM (Image Credit: Patrick Edwin Moran, Wikimedia Commons CC SA 3.0 Unported)
Species: Hogna carolinensis
Longevity: 2 – 3 years
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ¾ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The Carolina Wolf Spider has a large head and long legs- these spiders can be found on walls or trees outside. The Carolina Wolf Spiders are usually brown, with a dark stripe running down their back extending to the end of their abdomen- it looks like they have a black belt over their bodies!


7. Woodlouse Hunter Spider

Großer Asseljäger Dysdera crocata
Großer Asseljäger Dysdera crocata (Image Credit: Holger Krisp, Wikimedia Commons CC 3.0 Unported)
Species:  D. crocata
Longevity: 3 – 4 years
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ½ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The Woodlouse Hunter Spider belongs to the family of spiders known as Linyphiidae. They are characterized by their small size and light brown color. This type of spider is not aggressive, but it can bite if they feel threatened. They are usually found close to the ground where they hunt for prey, including woodlice, slugs, beetles, and other insects that live on the floor. They are often found near homes or outbuildings where they hope to see prey.


8. Yellow Garden Orb Weaver Spider

Argiope aurantia SCA-0499
Argiope aurantia SCA-0499 (Image Credit: R. A. Nonenmacher, Wikimedia Commons CC SA 4.0 International)
Species: Argiope Aurantia
Longevity: 1 year
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: 1 – 6 inches
Diet: Carnivorous

The Yellow Garden Orb Weavers are usually found living in gardens- you may see them spinning webs on the flowers or other plants. The female spiders are brown with a yellow spot or line that goes down their abdomen. The males are gray with dark brown spots, and they can be as long as 6 inches.


9. American Grass Spider

American Grass Spider
Image Credit: Deedster, Pixabay
Species: Agelenopsis
Longevity: 1 year
Good to own as a pet?: Yes
Legal to own?: Yes
Adult size: ¼ inch
Diet: Carnivorous

The American Grass Spider builds a web between grass stems and leaves- these spiders are usually found on plants, flowers, or bushes. They have long, skinny legs with an orange abdomen that may be striped black. The Americans Grass Spiders are often confused for another spider species called the Black Widow spider because they look similar.

divider-spider

Are There Poisonous Spiders in Texas?

Yes, there are poisonous spiders in Texas. The Brown Recluse with a violin-shaped mark and the Black Widow are two of Texas’s most common venomous spiders.

Is There a Spider Season in Texas?

A spider season is a period in which one or more species of spiders become active. Spiders are predators, and they feed on other arthropods, such as insects, so their activity tends to be synchronous with that of the prey animals. So yes! There’s an annual cycle of spider activity in Texas, otherwise known as “spider season”.

Much of this annual cycle is driven by changes in ambient temperature and precipitation patterns in the southern United States. Spiders are most active during warm months when food availability is high because they can easily find prey to feed on, like insects or other arthropods that emerge from their hiding places as it warms up outside.

In Texas, spiders are active from early April to November, but they are most numerous in the summer months of May through August.

This is when temperatures are warmest and food sources, like insects, tend to be plentiful. Some species of spiders tolerate drought conditions better than others- those that do may emerge earlier and remain active later into fall or even winter. Like the Brown Widow and Black Widow, some species prefer warmer climates with annual maximum mean temperatures that are frequently above 75°F.

new spider divider

Conclusion

Spiders are found in Texas, but there is no need to fear. Many different types of spiders call the Lone Star state home, and they all have their unique characteristics. We hope this information will help put any spider fears at ease!


Featured Image Credit: Pong Wira, Shutterstock

Nicole Cosgrove

Nicole is the proud mom of Baby, a Burmese cat and Rosa, a New Zealand Huntaway. A Canadian expat, Nicole now lives on a lush forest property with her Kiwi husband in New Zealand. She has a strong love for all animals of all shapes and sizes (and particularly loves a good interspecies friendship) and wants to share her animal knowledge and other experts' knowledge with pet lovers across the globe.