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Home > General > Take Your Pet to Work Week 2024: When It Is & How It’s Celebrated

Take Your Pet to Work Week 2024: When It Is & How It’s Celebrated

Young woman with cat working on computer at table

If you work in an office setting and love animals, learning more about Take Your Pet to Work Week will bring you a great deal of joy! This unique tradition is all about celebrating our pets and sharing our work environment with them. The fun event takes place on the third full week of June every year and includes Take Your Dog to Work Day and Take Your Cat to Work Day.

In this article, we go over the most important information about Take Your Pet to Work Week, including the benefits of taking your pet to work and how to safely do so!

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When Is Take Your Pet to Work Week?

In 2023, Take Your Pet to Work Week took place from June 19 to June 23. According to its creators, Pet Sitters International, the event included Take Your Cat to Work Day on the 19th and Take Your Dog to Work Day on the 23rd.

The specific dates of Take Your Pet to Work Week change every year, but it always takes place the third full week of June, starting on Monday and ending on Friday. In 2024, the celebration will take place from June 17 to June 21.

What Are the Benefits of Taking Your Pet to Work?

cat lying on the computer desktop

If you have a pet, you know how important it is to spend quality time together and strengthen your bond. However, doing so can be tricky when you have a full-time job and other daily obligations.

With Take Your Pet to Work Week, many workers get the chance to experience the various benefits of taking their pets to work:

  • Additional emotional support at the workplace
  • More opportunities for socialization and connecting with coworkers
  • Improved office mood and more relaxed office vibes
  • Showing your pet that they’re part of the family
  • Work being less stressful and more interesting
  • Better work-life balance and more free time to spend with your pet
  • Better productivity and a more positive attitude
  • Attracting new employees/inspiring coworkers to adopt a pet

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Top 6 Tips for Safely Taking Your Pet to Work

Most pet parents look forward to experiencing Take Your Pet to Work Week all year round. To ensure that the event will go smoothly, you need to know how to take your pet to work safely.

Here is a list of tips that will help do so without causing any inconveniences or making anyone uncomfortable.

1. Get Permission

One of the most important things before taking your pet to work is to get permission, even if it’s Take Your Pet to Work Week. It’s crucial to ensure that your managers and coworkers are okay with you bringing your pet to the office. You should try to accommodate everyone’s needs, especially if there are people who are allergic to specific animals. After you get permission, you should be free to bring your pet to the office without any issues.

If there are particular reasons that your pet shouldn’t visit the office, you can still participate by placing your pet’s photo on your desk or planning an online pet contest with your coworkers and their animal companions.

Coffee,Cup,And,Computer,,Desktop,Pc.,For,Business,Blank,Screen
Image Credit:: Suradech Prapairat, Shutterstock

2. Schedule Participation With Other Coworkers

If the whole office is participating in the celebration, it’s best to make a schedule with your coworkers. This way, everyone can bring their pets in at the same time, allowing them to safely connect.

Also, scheduling the participation in advance will ensure that particular animals that might not get along are not mixed, in order to prevent possible mishaps.


3. Ensure That Your Pet Is Comfortable

When participating in Take Your Pet to Work Week, it’s extremely important to ensure that your furry companion is comfortable at the office.

The supplies that you’ll need to keep your pet comfy will vary based on the animal that you own. Also, if your pet experiences discomfort or anxiety, you’ll need an alternative way to celebrate instead of forcing your pet to hang out at your workspace.

cat sleeping on computer
Image courtesy of Isabel Ludick

4. Avoid Forcing Your Pet or Coworkers to Interact With One Another

If you bring your pet to work, keep in mind that not everyone will want to interact with your animal companion, and that’s entirely fine. Ensure that all interactions flow naturally, and don’t force your pet and coworkers to engage.

If someone wants to spend time with your pet, that’s great. Otherwise, keep your furry friend near you.


5. Pet-Proof Your Workspace

Before bringing your pet to work, you should pet-proof your workspace to lower the chances of possible accidents. Remove all chewable and breakable items from your desk, and move any electrical cables, cleaning products, or anything else that could put your pet in jeopardy.

For some pets, it’s also a good idea to bring a kennel or a baby gate to prevent your furry companion from wandering around the office.

female vet on computer with white dog
Image credit: Creativa Images, Shutterstock

6. Prepare an Exit Strategy

Although taking your pet to work can be fun and exciting, it can also be stressful, especially if your pet is not used to large crowds. You should prepare an exit strategy that you can follow if your pet becomes uncomfortable.

Depending on your options, you can have a family member on standby if your pet needs to go home or contact a professional pet service to care for your pet until your shift ends. Either way, having some sort of exit plan will make the whole experience more manageable.

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The 4 Things That You Shouldn’t Do During Take Your Pet to Work Week

While it’ll be fun bringing your pet to work, it’s also important to learn about the things that you shouldn’t do when your pet is at the office with you.

1. Don’t Bring Undisciplined Pets

Although all pets are welcome to celebrate Take Your Pet to Work Week, not all pets are actually suitable for being in an office setting. Never bring undisciplined pets to your work, as they could cause problems for your coworkers and their pets.

Basically, if you have an animal that is aggressive or likes to jump, be loud, and knock things over, it might be best to keep them at home.

Playful polydactyl Maine Coon Cat
Image Credit: Seregraff, Shutterstock

2. Don’t Bring Sick Pets

Regardless of how much you love your pet, you should never bring your furry companion to work if they are sick. They could easily make other people’s pets sick, the ramifications of which could range from inconvenient to dangerous. So, if you want to bring your pet to work to celebrate this week, ensure that your furry companion is in good health.


3. Don’t Let Your Pet Roam Around

Even if you have an adorable, calm, and well-behaved pet, you should never allow them to wander and roam around the office when you bring them in to celebrate Take Your Pet to Work Week.

Instead, keep your furry friend near you at all times, and ensure that you’re always nearby in case something happens.

Brown mixed breed dog with tongue out walking running inside house
Image Credit: Alessandra Sawick, Shutterstock

4. Don’t Force Your Pet Onto Your Coworkers

Although many people are pet lovers, not everyone likes to interact with animals, so you should never force your pet onto your coworkers. Allow anyone who’s interested to interact with your pet, but don’t force meetings if they’re not genuine.

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Final Thoughts

Take Your Pet to Work Week is an excellent celebration that helps people around the country connect with their pets so they can experience a workplace setting together. This unique practice is extremely beneficial for both employees and pets, so if you’re a pet parent, be sure to participate!


Featured Image Credit: New Africa, Shutterstock

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