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What Kind of Dog Breed Was Spuds MacKenzie?

bull terrier on green field

If Spuds MacKenzie was a part of your childhood, you probably have a massive love for this spotted cutie. If you’ve always loved Spuds but haven’t seen a dog like him in real life, you might wonder what kind he is. After all, he’s a hard face to forget.

Spuds was a Bull Terrier. These dogs are amazingly protective creatures with exuberant energy and happy-go-lucky personalities. Let’s learn more about the breed and Spuds MacKenzie himself… or is it herself?

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Spuds MacKenzie: the Dog on Screen

Spuds MacKenzie is a fictional character who played the Bud Light mascot. Spuds had his five minutes of fame as the instantly recognizable face in all of those commercials no one can get out of their head. Spuds was around long enough to spark a memory when you mention his name.

What might surprise you is that Spuds MacKenzie was portrayed as a male in the commercials. However, this Bull Terrier was a pedigreed female given the name Honey Tree Evil Eye—or Evie for short.

Career

Spuds, or Evie, is most widely known for her commercial role in Bud Light advertisements. Even though Spuds probably could’ve done a lot more in the limelight, this was her first and only role.

In the 80s, it was an everyday thing to see Spuds and her newest button-up Hawaiian shirt, partying with the best of them.

The Maker for Spuds MacKenzie

Creator Jon Moore thought up the idea for Spuds MacKenzie. It all began with a Bud Light Super Bowl commercial in 1987.

Spuds Controversial Retirement

Soon after the campaign launched with Spuds MacKenzie, the commercials were under almost immediate scrutiny. The public, along with members of state governments, claimed these ads targeted children, inspiring interest in alcoholic beverages early.

The commercials underwent so much controversy, Bud Light ended the campaign in 1989, retiring Spuds. Their comments on the matter were basically that the fuss wasn’t worth the fight.

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Image Credit: TC-TORRES, Pixabay

Off Screen

Spuds MacKenzie was owned by Stan and Jackie Oles of North Riverside. Even though their pup was in the limelight for several years, three years before her death, they respected the privacy of their retired pooch. She was never in any films or other commercials after her contract with Bud Light was up.

Death

In October 1993, Spuds MacKenzie went over the rainbow bridge. It seems that Spuds suffered from kidney failure, which is an unfortunate but common health issue in the breed. Sadly, she was only ten years old. But in her short life, she definitely accomplished more than most dogs. She died comfortably at her home in Chicago with her loving owners.

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The Bull Terrier: About the Breed

Bull Terriers are extremely popular due to their unique looks and happy-go-lucky personalities. Spuds MacKenzie isn’t the first Bull Terrier to make their way into the spotlight. You might also recognize a Bull Terrier from other films and stories, and don’t forget the poster child for Target—Bullseye!

Quick Facts

Height: 22 inches
Weight: 49 – 84 pounds
Colors: White, brindle & white, tri-color, red & white, fawn & white, white & black, black, tan & white
Personality: Protective, affectionate, stubborn, intelligent
Notable Concerns: Can sometimes exhibit aggression

Intelligence

It might make sense to you that Bull Terriers are brilliant creatures. They have a keen sense of loyalty and become extremely connected to family members. Because of their “bull-headedness,” no pun intended, they are typically a little stubborn if you try to convince them to do something they really don’t want to do.

However, they also have an unmatched sense of loyalty to owners, making them much more likely to listen if they think you’re mad at them. These dogs are very emotionally intuitive and tend to pick up on the energy around the room.

These kinds of dogs know you’re sad, happy, mad, etc., and will respond accordingly.

Physical Appearance

Bull Terriers have a distinct look, touting a slightly curved snout running/with a top of the head. These beauties are typically very stocky and muscular.

Bull Terriers have some pretty interesting markings. Like other bull breeds, they are typically solid colored, patched, or brindle.

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Image Credit: Alexandra Morrison Photo, Shutterstock

Social Nature

Bull Terriers are usually extremely friendly with people. Although, they can be somewhat territorial. They are also known to be a little aggressive, even though that’s not always the case. In any situation, early socialization is key to promoting a healthy social life for your dog.

Bull Terriers get super attached. You could almost consider them Velcro dogs since they want in on all the happenings. They love being a part of your every day and might not do well in single-person households or with individuals who work away often.

Families

Bull Terriers tend to be very protective and aware in family settings. These loyal dogs will stand by your side, especially if they feel you are in danger. To help your Bull Terrier differentiate from a threat or pal, it’s important to train early and effectively.

These dogs have a great energy level to make phenomenal playmates. So, if you have young kids, this breed will be their first best friend. However, on the opposite end, these dogs are stalky and stubborn, which might make them challenging for seniors or disabled individuals.

Other Pets

These dogs tend to make good pals with other pets, permitting they are introduced early. Once a Bull Terrier is set in its ways, it’s difficult to change its mind. So, if your Bull Terrier has never been around cats before, they might always have the predator/prey dynamic.

It isn’t at all uncommon to have a Bull Terrier with a high prey drive who can’t be around cats or smaller pets. It’s also equally common to see bull terriers show same-sex or territorial aggression with other dogs. Proper introductions, patience, and professional training can help with these issues should they arise.

Never make any assumptions about a dog’s temperament with other pets until it’s been established. Always make introductions slow, watch body language closely, and deal with the situation appropriately.

Diet

Because Bull Terriers are so muscular, feeding them a high-protein, high-fat diet is best. Like any other dog, your Bull Terrier would require protein-dense high-quality dog food that is grain-inclusive. These sorts of recipes will appropriately fit a bull terrier’s overall lifestyle.

If you are dogs’ activity level decreases as they age, you can switch to a regular standard diet. Always follow your veterinarian’s recommendation based on your pet’s activity level and age.

Exercise

Bull Terriers will love snuggling up with you on the couch, but they also need to have a strenuous exercise regimen. A board Bull Terrier can lead to unwanted behaviors such as being destructive. To avoid that, your bull terrier should have approximately 60 to 90 minutes of exercise per day.

Bull Terriers require quite a bit of mental stimulation, so make sure they’re getting enough mental exercise, too. You can play tons of games with your pup—and they will love every minute of it. Bull terriers tend to be very alert and mindful during playtime, increasing focus.

You can count on your Bull Terrier to accompany you on jogs, walks, hikes, and any adventure you want to take. These shadow dogs will always be amped up for exercise and shenanigans of any kind, as long as they are with their families.

Training

Bull Terriers are moderately easy to train, but they might require a little extra patience. Because of their intelligence, they can prove a little difficult to persuade. Even though they might be a bit challenging, a lot of this greatly depends on personality.

Some Bull Terriers might be much more willing to please than others, making for an easier ride. In any case, the Bull Terrier should learn basic concepts with ease. You might be surprised how quickly they potty train and perform other simple tasks.

Health

Unfortunately, Bull Terriers aren’t the healthiest dog breeds. It’s an unfortunate part of years of breeding malpractice that these dogs suffer from specific genetic ailments. Certain conditions simply plague the breed, such as what happened to the real Spuds MacKenzie.

Common and routine vet care is critical to ensure the longevity of your dog. Kidney failure, among other health issues, tends to cut their lives somewhat short. But they sure have a lot of love to give while alive.

Grooming

Bull Terriers don’t require special maintenance, thanks to their short singular layer coats. You can brush them a few times a week if you want to eliminate any debris or dander buildup. Otherwise, you can bathe them roughly every six weeks to freshen them up.

It would help if you always made nail clipping, teeth brushing, and air cleaning a routine part of care so that your bull terrier is used to it.

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Conclusion

So now you know that Spuds MacKenzie is a Bull Terrier—and a memorable one. If you decide that maybe you want a Bull Terrier for yourself, it’s best to do your research on the breed a little bit more after you read this article.

If you think that a Bull Terrier sounds like a hot winning pic for you, look for a license to breeders with a history of healthy offspring. Having a proven health history of both parents helps you determine that there are no underlying genetic issues that could crop up unexpectedly.


Featured Image Credit: tratong, Shutterstock

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