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Yorkie Poo (Yorkshire Terrier & Poodle Mix)

Brown Yorkie Poo standing in the grass
Height: 7 – 15 inches
Weight: 5 – 15 pounds
Lifespan: 10 – 15 years
Colors: Brown, tan, blue, cream, black, gray, chocolate, silver, red, apricot
Suitable for: Active families and singles, apartments or houses
Temperament: Confident, energetic, affectionate, intelligent, playful, loyal

The Yorkie Poo is an adorable mix of Toy or Miniature Poodle and the Yorkshire Terrier. Yorkies are feisty, brave, and affectionate dogs, and Poodles are known for their intelligence and energy. Mixing these two breeds will give you the best of both worlds. Yorkie Poos have only been around for several decades, but they have the same energy, smarts, and confidence as their parents.

Yorkie Poos are small dogs that might have long or short noses, perky or floppy ears, or long, plume-like tails or small, whip-like tails — it all depends on which parent they take after the most.

They tend to have silky coats that may or may not be curly, and they come in a wide variety of colors, including red, chocolate, silver, apricot, brown, cream, black, or gray. They might be a solid color or in several patterns and markings, which might include black or blue with tan points.

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Yorkie Poo Puppies — Before You Buy…

Energy:
Trainability:
Health:
Lifespan:
Sociability:

Yorkie Poos are energetic dogs that tend to be healthy overall and can have a long lifespan of up to 15 years. There can be a few challenges with training, but otherwise, they are relatively easy to train, and they get along with most people and other dogs.

What’s the Price of Yorkie Poo Puppies?

Yorkie Poo puppies range in price from $1,000 to $3,500, depending on the puppy’s coloring and the breeder. Seek out a good breeder, and avoid puppy mills and backyard breeders at all costs!

Once you’ve found a reputable breeder, follow these tips:

  1. Visit the breeder: It’s best if you can go to the breeder’s location because this will give you a firsthand look at their dogs and living space. Good breeders will keep things clean and sanitary, and all their dogs should be in good health and well-taken care of. Does the breeder seem to have a strong bond with their dogs? Aim for a virtual visit if you can’t go in person.
  2. Medical history:Request the dog’s health information and certificates. A responsible breeder will not hesitate to provide you with this information and will openly discuss their dog’s health with you.
  3. Meet the parents: You should always try to meet the parents of your puppy, particularly the mother, who should be with her puppies, anyway. You’ll be able to gauge the parents’ temperament and appearance, which will be helpful for you to have an understanding of what your puppy will be like as they mature.
  4. Ask questions:You should feel completely comfortable asking the breeder as many questions as you feel are necessary. Good breeders will answer your questions about their dogs and puppies willingly and will ask you questions too. Run from any breeder who avoids your questions or becomes angry or defensive.

Be prepared for extra costs with a new puppy. This list includes items that most new puppy owners will require:

  • Collar, harness, and leash
  • Puppy food
  • Water and food dishes
  • Treats for training
  • Puppy training pads
  • Toys for playing, cuddling, and chewing
  • Crate and bedding

Other ongoing expenses that you might expect throughout your puppy’s life include:

  • Obedience classes
  • Grooming
  • Spaying or neutering surgery
  • Microchipping
  • Annual veterinary appointments
  • Vaccinations

You can also think about adoption, though you will more than likely find an adult dog instead of a puppy. But you’ll end up giving a dog a second chance, and you’ll have one of the best life experiences. Adoption fees will range from $300 to $800, but if you adopt a senior or special needs dog, most rescue centers will lower or waive the fee.

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3 Little-Known Facts About Yorkie Poos

1. Yorkie Poos go by several names

They are also known as the Yorkipoo, Yoodle, Yorkerpoo, Yorkiedoodle, Yorkapoo, and Yorkiepoopoo!

2. The Yorkie Poo was bred for being hypoallergenic

As a mixed breed or “designer dog,” the Yorkie Poo was initially developed for their hypoallergenic coat and to be free from the kinds of health problems that tend to plague purebreds.

3. The Yorkie Poo is a known barker

These dogs are not shy about sharing their opinions on everything, so they make great watchdogs. However, if you are currently living in an apartment, your neighbors might be less than thrilled.

Yorkshire Terrier vs Miniature Poodle breed
The parent breeds of the Yorkie Poo: Left – Yorkshire Terrier (otsphoto, Shutterstock); Right – Miniature Poodle (PetraSolajova, Pixabay)

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Yorkie Poo

Yorkie Poos are spunky and energetic dogs that form strong bonds with their families. They are people-oriented and can be affectionate, entertaining, and charming dogs. They get along with most people, but they can be protective of their families.

Yorkie Poos are intelligent — both Yorkshire Terriers and Poodles are known for their smarts (the Poodle is thought to be the second most intelligent breed out there, just behind the Border Collie). They can be curious, scrappy, and sometimes bossy little dogs.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

Yorkie Poos make wonderful family dogs! They are loving, loyal, and playful and can make ideal companions. However, they would be better in a household with older children. They are small dogs, and younger children might accidentally hurt them. You should also teach your children how to treat dogs — no rough play, like pulling on ears or tails.

Does This Breed Get Along With Other Pets?

Yorkie Poos do tend to get along well with other dogs, but their Yorkshire Terrier side might lead to prey drive behavior. Yorkie Poos might chase smaller animals, so unless they’ve been raised with the other pets and socialized well, it’s best to keep them away from smaller animals.

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Things to Know When Owning a Yorkie Poo

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

Yorkie Poos are small and energetic dogs, so they need to be fed accordingly. Start by buying high-quality dog food that is meant for your pup’s current age, weight, and activity level. Follow the guidelines on the food bag itself, and speak to your vet if you’re unsure how much you should feed your Yorkie Poo every day.

You should also speak to your vet if you’re ever concerned about your Yorkie Poo’s weight. Always be careful about feeding people food and scraps to your dog.

Exercise 🐕

The Yorkie Poo is an energetic breed, but their small size means you don’t have to do a ton of exercising to meet their needs. Yorkie Poos can use at least 30 minutes of play or other activity daily in addition to several walks each day. So, while they do need to have all that energy expended, it’s easy to do because of their size.

Training 🎾

The intelligence of the Yorkie Poo makes them easy to train. They also love their owners a great deal, so they’re eager to please and willing to take on most tasks. The Yorkshire Terrier does have a bit of that famous terrier stubbornness, however, so you should expect that to creep into their training, particularly if they take after their Yorkie parent.

Grooming ✂️

Their coat will ultimately depend on which parent they take after the most. Poodles have curly coats and Yorkies have silky, long fur. Both breeds require frequent brushing and trimming, so it’s likely the Yorkie Poo will too. Brushing your dog every day would be your best bet, and it will need trimming on occasion.

The good news is that both the Poodle and Yorkie are hypoallergenic, so the Yorkie Poo doesn’t shed that much and might do well with allergy sufferers. Only give your Yorkie Poo a bath when necessary, and only do so with a good dog shampoo.

You should trim your Yorkie Poo’s nails every 3–4 weeks, brush their teeth about two or three times a week, and clean their ears around once a week.

Health and Conditions

The Yorkie Poo is a healthy dog and not as likely to experience the same degree of inherited health conditions as their purebred parents. However, there are possible conditions to be aware of.

Male vs. Female

The size of a dog is sometimes a good way to differentiate between males and females, but in the case of the Yorkie Poo, size is not necessarily going to help. Since they might take after one parent more than the other, their size is relative.

When you are thinking about surgery for your Yorkie Poo, neutering the male is a simpler and less expensive procedure than spaying the female. You’ll also see a difference in temperament, notably less aggression, and it can help prevent future health issues.

Temperament isn’t the best way to pick between a male and female dog, though. While it’s been said that females are easier to train and males are more affectionate, how the dog has been socialized and treated over the course of their life will give you their true personality.

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Final Thoughts

When you begin looking for one of these adorable dogs, you can start by talking to any local Yorkshire Terrier or Miniature/Toy Poodle breeders. They might be able to point you in the direction of a Yorkie Poo breeder. You can also post your interest through social media. This mixed breed isn’t as hard to find as some others, so you should be able to find a breeder without too much trouble.

You can also look into adoption. You might be able to find one at your local animal shelter or via rescue groups online.

Yorkie Poos make wonderful companions for the right family. If you’re looking for a dog with a mind of their own but who will also be devoted to you, the Yorkie Poo might be a perfect fit for your household.


Featured Image Credit: Steve Bruckmann, Shutterstock

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