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How Much Is a Turtle at PetSmart? What You Need To Know!

Oliver Jones

PetSmart is one of the most convenient pet stores throughout America, making them a favorite destination for pet purchasing. Depending on your state regulations, you may be considering purchasing a pet turtle from PetSmart.

Pet turtles from PetSmart are a bit expensive, but they aren’t outrageously priced. If you want to buy a turtle conveniently, PetSmart is one of the best options, but you might want to look elsewhere if you want the most affordable turtle or a turtle that is cared for properly.

Keep reading to learn how much turtles cost at PetSmart and other stores, as well as some tips about choosing the best purchasing location for your pet turtle.

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How Much Are Turtles at PetSmart?

The price of turtles from PetSmart ranges from about $25 to $40. The exact price depends on your location and, more importantly, the type of turtle you select.

Price of Different Turtle Types at PetSmart

The most common turtles sold at PetSmart include red-eared sliders, painted turtles, and African sideneck turtles. All three of these varieties are common at pet stores in the US, making them some of the most common types of pet turtles.

Red-eared sliders are the cheapest of these three varieties because they are the most common pet turtle. Red-eared sliders go for about $25 at PetSmart. They are named after the red stripe by their ears and are native to the US and Mexico. You can find red-eared sliders at most pet stores that sell turtles.

Painted turtles are also very common and affordable. They cost about $30 from PetSmart. It is widespread over North America, which is why they are so affordable. Much like red-eared sliders, you should be able to find painted turtles at most pet stores that sell turtles.

The African sideneck turtle is the most expensive type at PetSmart. It normally sells for about $40. The higher price is since they aren’t common in the United States by nature. But it is easy to raise in captivity, making it a common turtle pet everywhere.

Wild Florida chicken turtle
Image Credit: Chase Danimulls, Shutterstock

How Much Is a Turtle at Other Pet Stores?

In comparison to many places, PetSmart is more expensive for turtles. Although the turtles are not outrageously priced, you are still paying more at PetSmart than other pet stores, especially those specializing in exotic pets.

You can find turtles at much lower prices on online sites, such as Backwater Reptiles. For example, red-eared sliders go for about $15 on most online stores, whereas they are about $10 more expensive at PetSmart. The same is true of turtles sold at specialty exotic pet stores.

Some stores offer turtles at the same price, though. Most other convenient pet stores sell their turtles for about the same amount. Petco, for instance, sells turtles for about the same price as PetSmart.

Why Is PetSmart More Expensive?

The reason why PetSmart, Petco, and other similar pet stores are more expensive is that you’re paying for the convenience these stores offer. You can get the turtle the same day just by running a quick errand to your local pet store.

In comparison, online stores typically specialize in turtles, which means they have more turtles to sell. This makes their prices more affordable and much fairer based on the type. The downside of these websites is that you have to wait for your turtle to arrive.

European pond turtle in rock
Image Credit: Karin Jaehne, Shuitterstock

Why Are Some Turtles Expensive?

A few factors impact how expensive a turtle is. Most importantly, the rarity of the species determines its price. The more common the turtle is, the more affordable it will be. Conversely, rare turtles will be more expensive and more difficult to find.

Another factor that impacts a turtle’s price is its natural location. Some turtles are common on certain continents, which makes them affordable there. However, they might be more expensive across the world where they aren’t as common.

The last factor that impacts how expensive a turtle is its ease of breeding and care. Some turtles are very easy to care for, whereas others are sensitive to the environment and care. Turtles that require more care will be more expensive since more money and care went into the turtle’s breeding and growth.

Most turtles from PetSmart are affordable breeds because they are common, found in the US, and easy to breed and care for.

Eastern box turtle in Michigan
Image Credit: Suzanne Tucker, Shutterstock

Where Is the Best Place to Buy a Turtle?

When it comes time to pick out a turtle, it’s important to carefully select where you purchase the turtle from. Not all stores and breeders are equal. If you select a bad breeder, your turtle is more likely to die prematurely.

It’s better to look for expos in your area that offer reputable and healthfully-bred turtles. You can also trust some online stores, but it’s important that you read their reviews to ensure that the turtles are shipped carefully and safely.

You could also consider looking on Craigslist for turtles. Many people are looking to get rid of their turtles and will even give them away for free on Craigslist. Most of the turtles from Craigslist will be a bit older and be the most common breeds.

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Final Thoughts: PetSmart Turtle Cost

PetSmart is surprisingly expensive due to its convenience. Not to mention, they aren’t known for responsibly breeding and caring for their pets. Because of these two facts, you should avoid buying your turtles from PetSmart.

Instead, you can find healthier and more affordable turtles that are sold by individual breeders and online sites. Regardless of which breeder or store you choose, make sure that you carefully consider the purchase location so that you aren’t giving your money to individuals and companies that exploit turtles and refuse to care for them properly.


Featured Image Credit:  Candy Plus, Shutterstock

Oliver Jones

Oliver (Ollie) Jones - A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master's degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.